How To: Get ankle flexibility to improve swimming

This swim technique video series from a professional swimming coach hones in on the fine details for developing perfect alignment and stroke to help make you a better, more competitive athlete. The coach demonstrates the proper way to use swimming equipment and how to position your body to condition your swimming performace. This series is particularly helpful in that not only is the coaching beneficial, but the drills, including dryland training, are shown in practice. It's the next best thi...

How To: Do the tumble turn in swimming

This quick how-to animation demonstrates how to do a tumble turn in swimming. Follow along and see how easy it is to do tumble turns. The main purpose of the tumble turn is to finish one length and begin the next as fast as possible. In freestyle races, you do not have to touch the wall with your hands. Any part of your body is fine, and using the feet gets a much faster turn.

How To: Improve the back crawl turn in swimming

This quick how-to animation demonstrates who to do a back crawl turn in swimming. The hardest thing to do in the back crawl turn is to find the wall. There are a couple of ways to do this. The first is to look for the flags across the pool and count your strokes from the flags. The other is to count how many strokes it takes to get from one end to the other. You need to leave space to turn on to your front and tumble, so don't count all the way to the end of the pool.

How To: Do exercises to improve your swim speed

Without speed, you'd swim like a turtle at your swim club races, which is okay if you're into leisurely paced losing. Whether you're navigating away from a hungry shark who likes your "Family Guy" swim trunks or trying to finally snag that "First Place" trophy, speed is something you can always improve on.

How To: Swim using the butterfly stroke

Butterfly needs both stamina and technique, but the body movements are not difficult because you will have done many of them before in other strokes. When racing butterfly, your arms must come out of the water on every stroke. They must not drag through the water when they move from your hips to the entry position. Follow along with this quick how-to animation to learn how to do the butterfly stroke for swimming.

How To: Practice breaststroke and butterfly turns

This how-to animations shows you the basic turns for breast and butterfly strokes in swimming. Watch and see how easy it is to improve your swimming techniques with these steps. The same type of turn is used for both butterfly and breaststroke. The laws say that you must touch the wall with two hands, so a touch and pivot turn is used. The main thing to remember is that you don't need to hang on to the wall. The quicker you touch it and pull your hands away the better.

How To: Do the breast stroke faster and more easily

The breast stroke may seem like an afterthought at modern Olympics dominated by the Freestyle and IM events, but it still has two of it's own races and is a part of the IM and Medley Relays, so knowing how to do it well is still great for any competitive swimmer. This video, put together by one such person, offers great advice on all areas of the stroke, from the stroke itself to starts and turns. If you already do breast stroke and just need to get a little bit faster, this video has tips fo...

How To: Flip turn in three easy steps

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to do flip turns in three easy steps. The first step is to be able to do a regular somersault. Begin by standing on the black line away from the wall and execute a flip. The second step is to stand at arms-length away from the wall and execute a flip without touching the wall. The third step is to execute a flip that is arms-length away from the wall. Land the feet on the wall and pause with hands above the head. This video will benefit those viewers ...

How To: Do warm up exercises for swimming

Watch this video for warm-up exercises you can do before you swim - or before any sort of workout - to build up your heart rate. By changing the plane of your body several times within the three-minute warm-up you'll force your heart to work harder, which means a bigger calorie burn.

How To: Swim in a triathlon

In order to swim in a triathlon, according to Jodie Swallow’s technique, you will need an efficient stroke. You will need to work on your turn over. Try to aim for 90 strokes per minute. Rhythm, flow, and momentum are key. You will want to find your rhythm and keep it throughout. Timing is important. Breathe at the same point of each breathing stroke. Flex your wrist to improve your feel of the water and your momentum. Try to keep your elbows high and bent, when in the under water portion o...

How To: Do a simplified flipturn

Flip turns can be one of the most challenging aspects of learning how to swim races. Suddenly flipping over and turning around like that can be very disorienting. With this tutorial, learn how to simplify the flipturn at the beginning of your learning process.

How To: Go skinny-dipping

Always wanted to try skinny dipping but not sure quite how to get the ball rolling? There's not much to it but with a little bit of forward thinking you can make sure to get your friends on board while avoiding cops and an unwanted audience.

Swim Better, Swim Faster: Lessons from the Gay Army Tri Swim Coach

By Louis Tharp RealJock.com is pleased to present this first in a series of articles on improving your swimming form and performance from Louis Tharp, out gay man, swim coach for the Army Triathlon Team at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, and author of the new book Overachiever's Diary: How the Army Triathlon Team Became World Contenders. Tharp is the first out gay coach in the history of West Point.

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